Police Dogs Die Left in a Hot Squad Car

policedogdiesincar

 

Two police dogs have died in the past couple weeks while left in a hot vehicle.

First in Alabama:

A canine working with the police department in Gulf Shores, Alabama died after being left in a hot patrol car, reports CBS affiliate WGCL.

The Baldwin County District Attorney’s Office said the case will go to a grand jury, the station reported.

According to police, the dog’s handler, Cpl. Josh Coleman, forgot that the K-9 named Mason was still in the back seat of his patrol car.

Sgt. Jason Woodruff told CBS affiliate WKRG the officer left Mason inside his vehicle on Thursday June 18, after attending a conference in Gulf Shores.

“He was going to take care of some paperwork in his office and he straight up forgot him,” said Woodruff. “Left him in the car.”

According to WGCL, the canine, who was in serious distress when located, was rushed to a veterinarian’s office.

“He was treated aggressively for his condition and there were hopeful signs that Mason was doing better (last) Friday morning,” Woodruff said. “However, Friday evening, Mason’s condition began to deteriorate rapidly. Around 11:00 PM…Mason went into respiratory failure and passed away.”

And now in Georgia:

CONYERS, Ga. – A police dog died on Thursday night after being left in a hot patrol car by his handler in Conyers, reports CBS affiliate WGCL.

Zane, a 5-year-old bloodhound, was found dead around 5 p.m. at the house of Jerahmy Williams.

Police say the dog had been in the hot car for nearly 10 hours.

Williams told police that he fell asleep at his house after returning from work. He says he was feeling ill. Williams was under the impression that he had taken Zane to the kennel – but when he woke up he realized his mistake, unfortunately it was too late.

According to the station, Williams has been with the police department for almost 5 years and is a patrol corporal. Zane had worked with the Conyers police for four years and three of those were with Williams.

Williams has been placed on administrative leave with pay and could be charged with animal abuse and reckless conduct pending an internal investigation.

“We are committed to the care and proper treatment of our working K9s. We are mourning the loss of our own,” police chief Gene Wilson told the station.